Girls in White Dresses

Leave a comment

Continuing my interest in reading wedding-related stories, I found Girls in White Dresses by Jennifer E. Close. Her most recent book The Hopefuls wasn’t my favorite, but I decided to give this one a try.

From it’s title, I expected Girls in White Dresses to be a story about friends being bridesmaids in a mutual friend’s weddings. Instead, I found a series of vignettes that involve the same group of friends from college. The short stories cover several years of their lives, including moving out of their houses and to New York City, experiencing¬† relationships, getting married and having kids.

I did find some of the topics to be relatable. Reading about being in your 20s and watching friends and classmates get married and have kids describes a majority of my life right now. But that was really the only part of the “novel” that I liked. The female characters were one-dimensional and boring, and they all seemed to blur together after awhile. They were constantly described as uncertain about whether they like their boyfriends or not, and their passive attitudes drove me crazy. Not to say that people aren’t like that in real life, but I’m not sure if every single 20-something feels that way, which is what Close seemed to imply. I’m pretty sure that if you are to marry someone, it should be based off of how you feel and not what others tell you.

I would recommend borrowing this one from the library like I did.

 

 

Advertisements

The Hopefuls

Leave a comment

Washington, D.C. has been the center of media attention since the beginning of this year. It makes sense, since we are in the first year of a new administration and all the newness provides countless stories for the press. The fact that I currently live here too gives me a front row view of what is going on. But there’s another side to D.C., one that has to do with the people and the culture. This is one of the plot points of Jennifer Close’s novel The Hopefuls.

Beth and Matt Kelly have recently moved to Washington, D.C. from New York City due to Matt getting a new job. While Matt settles into his new workplace, Beth, unemployed and stir crazy, struggles to adjust to life in a new city and to make new friends. Things get interesting when they meet Jimmy and Ashleigh Dillon, Texas natives who offer a new perspective on what moving to a new place has to offer. When Jimmy decides to move back to Texas and run for public office, they invite the Kellys to manage their campaign and live in Texas for the year. Though Beth and Matt are looking forward to an adventure, they soon find out that campaigning is not as easy as it seems.

I could relate to Beth on many levels. The adjustment to living in D.C. is a definite one. I never lived in New York, but it took some time to get used to all the people, navigating the streets and the grocery stores. The unemployed factor: I at one point did not work for over two months, and while it was nice at first, not having a job made focusing and maintaining and identity difficult.

Close did a great job of capturing the city’s essence, from people knowing each other’s connections to the nicknames of the Safeways. However, I felt like the setting was what made most of the story. There was no real plot, and the pages were mostly filled with descriptions of Beth’s experiences: what people were doing, where they were going, and so on. ¬†There was some insight as to the stress and mental toll a campaign can have on those involved and some character development, but no major climax or anything like that. I found myself skipping ahead a couple of times just to see what would happen.

I recommend this novel for those who enjoy a perspective of D.C., but be prepared for a story that doesn’t have much substance other than that.